Finally public

After much faffing about with repeated sending of faxes to multiple numbers I finally proved I was human and accountable enough for “Edit with Emacs” to appear on the Chrome Extension Gallery. This almost immediately showed up some documentation and usage usability issues so I spent some of my spare time at the weekend creating an options page. I’ve also got a growing number of feature branches coming in from other github users so I merged some more contributions into the v1.4 release.

I have to say the usage of git as an SCM tool as well as github’s non-fussy functional website makes managing contributions a lot easier. It’s nice to see the world has moved on since the venerable SourceForge was the only option for those who didn’t want to bother maintaining their own project infrastructure.

One of the feature branches being proposed is changing the interface to the “Edit Server” to pass a richer set of information about the text area being edited. This would allow the server to do clever things like position the frame near the position of the text area on the browser and possibly manipulate fonts. So far I’m trying to keep the current edit server calling conventions similar to those offered by other similar extensions that need to do a similar thing. Although for Emacs users edit-server.el will surely be the default and most used method it seems churlish to break compatibility for those that prefer to run/hack other servers. I’ve been documenting the URL conventions so it would be nice if I got some feedback how to maintain a useful extensible “API” for the broadest range of solutions.